March 2019 Newsletter

Construction Safety, By the Numbers

10 According to OSHA, about 1 in every 10 construction workers sustain an injury each year. Many construction companies and workers operate under the idea that injuries don’t happen often and that only those who are disregarding safety rules can become injured. This can serve as an excellent reminder that…

Dust to Dust: A Look at Silica Dust FAQs

Ever since OSHA began enforcing its respirable crystalline silica standard for general industry in June 2018, employers have struggled to understand compliance requirements. In late January, OSHA published a list of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) and answers developed with industry stakeholders to relieve some of the confusion. The silica standard…

Hello from SC PRIMA!

This past week NASP had the honor in joining the South Carolina Public Risk Management Association for their 2019 annual conference in historic Charleston. During this two-day conference, Eric Gislason, NASP’s Executive Director, had the opportunity to present on the intricacies of OSHA as well as Safety Management Systems. We…

I Had a Joke About Construction, but I’m Still Working on It

Last issue, NASP announced the launch of our new Certified Safety Manager-Construction course, and it was met with great enthusiasm! This 40-hour course highlights the same training methodologies as our traditional CSM course while also offering construction specific training on:   OSHA and the Focus Four PPE and Lifesaving Equipment…

Environmental Health and Safety Professional Certificate (EHS)

We are proud to announce the completion of our new and improved Environmental Health and Safety Professional Certificate (EHS) course into the Learning Management System (LMS). Are you a busy professional who desires to improve your knowledge and credentials but has little time for classroom training? Then this class is…

OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (HAZCOM) 1910.1200

History OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (HAZCOM) was first adopted in 1983 in the United States with limited scope (48 FR 53280; November 25, 1983). In 1987, scope was expanded to cover all industries where employees are potentially exposed to hazardous chemicals (52 FR 31852; August 24, 1987). OSHA revised its…